Jerusalem, Israel
June 7-11, 2015
25th International Conference on Automated Planning and Scheduling
Jerusalem

Research Workshop of the Israel Science Foundation








PlanRob - Workshop on Planning and Robotics

Topics and Objectives

Robotics is one of the most appealing and natural applicative area for the Planning and Scheduling (P&S) research activity, however such a natural interest seems not reflected in an equally important research production for the Robotics community. In this perspective, the aim of the PlanRob workshop is twofold. On the one hand, this workshop would constitute a fresh impulse for the ICAPS community to develop its interests and efforts towards this challenging research area. On the other hand, it aims at attracting representatives from the Robotics community to discuss their challenges related to planning for autonomous robots (deliberative, reactive, continuous planning and execution etc.) as well as their expectations from the P&S community.

The PlanRob workshop aims at constituting a stable, long-term forum on relevant topics concerned with the interactions between Robotics and P&S communities where researchers could discuss about the opportunities and challenges of P&S when applied to Robotics.

Started during ICAPS 2013 in Rome (Italy) and followed by the second edition at ICAPS 2014 in Portsmouth (NH, USA), the PlanRob WS series (http://pst.istc.cnr.it/planrob/) has gathered very good feedback from the P&S community which is also confirmed by the organisation of a specific Robotics Track at ICAPS 2014 chaired by Felix Ingrand and Leslie Kaelbling (http://icaps14.icaps-conference.org/specialtracks/robotics.html) and also this year at ICAPS 2015 chaired by Reid Simmons and Micheal Beetz (http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/ icaps15/tracks/robotics.html).

Sponsors

PlanRob 2015 is partially supported by the FourByThree project (http://www.fourbythree.euc - EU H2020 G.A. FoF- 637095) and the SHERPA project (http://www.sherpa-project.eu EU FP7 G.A. ICT-600958).

Proceedings

The full PLANROB proceedings are available as a pdf file [file has been updated -June 14).

Schedule

DAY 1 - June 7, 2015 (Room E)

13:50-14:00PlanRob WS Introduction
14:00-15:00 Keynote: Reid Simmons (Carnegie Mellon University, USA)
Robust Autonomy
Session: Context and Constraint Reasoning
15:00-15:30 Solomon Eyal Shimony, Gera Weiss and Liat Cohen
Estimating the Probability of Meeting a Deadline in Hierarchical Plans
15:30-16:00 Coffee Break
Session: Task, motion and path planning
16:00-16:30 Jonathan Ferrer-Mestres, Guillem Francès and Hector Geffner
Planning with State Constraints and its Application to Combined Task and Motion Planning
16:30-17:00 Weifeng Chen and Martin Müller
Continuous Arvand: Motion Planning with Monte Carlo Random Walks
17:00-17:30 Ty Nguyen and Tsz-Chiu Au
Motion Planning for Arrival Time and Velocity Requirements on Non-homogeneous Roads
17:30-18:00 Roi Yehoshua, Noa Agmon and Gal Kaminka
Frontier-Based RTDP: A New Approach to Solving the Robotic Adversarial Coverage Problem
Session: Benchmarking
18:00-18:30 Pablo Muñoz, Amedeo Cesta, Andrea Orlandini and Maria D. R-Moreno
A Framework for Performance Assessment of Autonomous Robotic Controllers
18:30-19:00 Tim Niemueller, Gerhard Lakemeyer and Alexander Ferrein
The RoboCup Logistics League as a Benchmark for Planning in Robotics

DAY 2 - June 8, 2015 (Room B)

08:55-09:00 PlanRob WS Introduction 2
09:00-10:00 Keynote: Steve Chien (NASA JPL)
Using Constraint-based Search to Schedule Science Campaigns for the Rosetta Orbiter
Session: Context and Constraint Reasoning
10:00-10:30 Andreas Hofmann and Paul Robertson
Active Perception: Using Goal Context to Guide Sensing and Other Actions
10:30-11:00 Coffee Break
11:00-11:30 Michael Cashmore, Maria Fox, Derek Long, Daniele Magazzeni, Bram Ridder and Francesco Maurelli
Dynamically Extending Planning Models using an Ontology
Session: Planning and Execution
11:30-12:00 Dylan O'Ceallaigh and Wheeler Ruml
Metareasoning for Concurrent Planning and Execution
12:00-12:30 Breelyn Kane Styler and Reid Simmons
Robust Efficient Robot Planning through Varying Model Fidelity
12:30-13:00 Enrique Fernandez Gonzalez, Erez Karpas and Brian Williams
Mixed Discrete-Continuous Heuristic Generative Planning based on Flow Tubes (extended version)
13:00-14:00 Lunch Break
Session: Multi Robot framework
14:00-14:30 Gal Kaminka
No robot is an island, no team an archipelago: Plan execution for cooperative multi-robot teams
14:30-15:00 Mark Roberts, Swaroop Vattam, Ron Alford, Bryan Auslander, Tom Apker, Benjamin Johnson and David Aha
Goal Reasoning to Coordinate Robotic Teams for Disaster Relief
Session: Human-Robot Interaction
15:00-15:30 Tathagata Chakraborti, Gordon Briggs, Kartik Talamadupula, Matthias Scheutz, David Smith and Subbarao Kambhampati
Planning for Serendipity - Altruism in Human-Robot Cohabitation
15:30-16:00 Coffee Break
16:00-16:30 Tathagata Chakraborti, Tony Zhang, David Smith and Subbarao Kambhampati
Planning with Stochastic Resource Profiles: An Application to Human-Robot Co-habitation
16:30-17:00 Mouaddib Abdel-Illah, Laurent Jeanpierre and Shlomo Zilberstein
Handling Advice in MDPs for Semi-Autonomous Systems
17:00-17:30 Panel Session

Keynote Information

Reid Simmons

Robust Autonomy

Abstract: The keynote will present some recent results on robust autonomy as well as a quick survey of planning & execution and robot architectures.

Bio: Reid Simmons is a Research Professor and Associate Director for Education at the Carnegie Mellon University.

His research interests focus on developing reliable, highly autonomous systems (especially mobile robots) that operate in rich, uncertain environments. The goal is to create intelligent systems that can operate autonomously for long periods of time in unstructured, natural environments. This necessitates robots that can plan, effectively reason about uncertainty, diagnose and recover from unanticipated errors, and reason about their limitations. In particular, He is interested in architectures for autonomy that combine deliberative and reactive behavior, reliable execution monitoring and error recovery, multi-robot coordination, probabilistic and symbolic planning, formal verification of autonomous systems, and human-robot social interaction.

Steve Chien

Using Constraint-based Search to Schedule Science Campaigns for the Rosetta Orbiter

Abstract: In August 2014, Rosetta (http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/) entered orbit around the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Rosetta, a European Space Agency led mission to explore the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is the first mission to deploy a soft lander to a comet, and to escort a comet for an extended period (over one year).

But Rosetta is also a pathfinding space mission from the perspective of Operations, Computer Science, and Artificial Intelligence in it’s usage of the ASPEN Artificial Intelligence planning and scheduling software for early to mid-range science activity scheduling.

In my talk I first briefly discuss comets and their importance in understanding the evolution of our solar system and life on Earth. Second, I describe elements of the multi- disciplinary Rosetta science planning process which incorporates diverse science, geometric, engineering, and resource constraints. Next, I describe the constraint-driven scheduling automation and how AI has much to offer not only in schedule generation, but in constraint enforcement, problem and constraint analysis, and in iterative schedule refinement. Finally, I will discuss prospects for onboard decision-making for future cometary missions highlighting robotics challenges related to planning and scheduling.

Bio: Dr. Steve Chien is Head of the Artificial Intelligence Group and Senior Research Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology where he leads efforts in autonomous systems for space exploration.

Dr. Chien has received numerous awards for his research in space autonomous systems: he has been awarded three NASA Medals in 1997, 2000, and 2007; he is a four time honoree in the NASA Software of the Year competition; and in 2011 he was awarded the innaugural AIAA Intelligent Systems Award. He has led the deployment of ground and flight autonomy software to numerous missions including the Autonomous Sciencecraft on Earth Observing One, the WATCH software to the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Earth Observing Sensorweb, and the IPEX Cubesat. He is currently leading the deployment of ASPEN for scheduling science observations for the Rosetta mission, an ESA-led mission to explore the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

The ASPEN deployment to Rosetta is a joint JPL-ESA effort including: Steve Chien, Gregg Rabideau, Daniel Tran, Martina Troesch, Joshua Doubleday (JPL/Caltech/NASA) and Federico Nespoli, Miguel Perez Ayucar, Marc Costa Sitja, Claire Vallat, Bernhard Geiger, Nico Altobelli, Manuel Fernandez, Fran Vallejo, Rafael Andres, Michael Kueppers (ESA).

Accepted Papers

  • Solomon Eyal Shimony, Gera Weiss and Liat Cohen
    Estimating the Probability of Meeting a Deadline in Hierarchical Plans
  • Roi Yehoshua, Noa Agmon and Gal Kaminka
    Frontier-Based RTDP: A New Approach to Solving the Robotic Adversarial Coverage Problem
  • Michael Cashmore, Maria Fox, Derek Long, Daniele Magazzeni, Bram Ridder and Francesco Maurelli
    Dynamically Extending Planning Models using an Ontology
  • Pablo Muñoz, Amedeo Cesta, Andrea Orlandini and Maria D. R-Moreno
    A Framework for Performance Assessment of Autonomous Robotic Controllers
  • Andreas Hofmann and Paul Robertson
    Active Perception: Using Goal Context to Guide Sensing and Other Actions
  • Jonathan Ferrer-Mestres, Guillem Francès and Hector Geffner
    Planning with State Constraints and its Application to Combined Task and Motion Planning
  • Ty Nguyen and Tsz-Chiu Au
    Motion Planning for Arrival Time and Velocity Requirements on Non-homogeneous Terrains
  • Weifeng Chen and Martin Müller
    Continuous Arvand: Motion Planning with Monte Carlo Random Walks
  • Mark Roberts, Swaroop Vattam, Ron Alford, Bryan Auslander, Tom Apker, Benjamin Johnson and David Aha
    Goal Reasoning to Coordinate Robotic Teams for Disaster Relief
  • Gal Kaminka.
    No robot is an island, no team an archipelago: Plan execution for cooperative multi-robot teams
  • Dylan O'Ceallaigh and Wheeler Ruml
    Metareasoning for Concurrent Planning and Execution
  • Tim Niemueller, Gerhard Lakemeyer and Alexander Ferrein
    The RoboCup Logistics League as a Benchmark for Planning in Robotics
  • Breelyn Kane Styler and Reid Simmons
    Robust Efficient Robot Planning through Varying Model Fidelity
  • Enrique Fernandez Gonzalez, Erez Karpas and Brian Williams
    Mixed Discrete-Continuous Heuristic Generative Planning based on Flow Tubes (extended version)
  • Tathagata Chakraborti, Tony Zhang, David Smith and Subbarao Kambhampati
    Planning with Stochastic Resource Profiles: An Application to Human-Robot Co-habitation
  • Tathagata Chakraborti, Gordon Briggs, Kartik Talamadupula, Matthias Scheutz, David Smith and Subbarao Kambhampati
    Planning for Serendipity
  • Mouaddib Abdel-Illah, Laurent Jeanpierre and Shlomo Zilberstein
    Handling Advice in MDPs for Semi-Autonomous Systems

Call for Papers

This third edition of the PlanRob workshop has been proposed in synergy with the Robotics Track to further enforce the original goal and to maintain a more informal forum where also more preliminary/visionary work can be discussed as well as more direct and open interactions/discussions may find the right place.

Topics of interest include, but not limited to:

  • planning domain representations for robotics applications;
  • robot motion, path, and mission planning;
  • integrated planning and execution in robotic architectures;
  • planning and coordination methods for multi-robots;
  • mixed-initiative planning and sliding autonomy for robotic systems;
  • human-aware planning and execution in human-robot interaction;
  • adversarial action planning in competitive robotic domains;
  • formal methods for robot planning and control;
  • P&S methods for optimization and adaptation in robotics;
  • benchmark planning domains for robots;
  • real-world planning applications for autonomous robots.

Important Dates

  • Paper submission: February 20, 2015 EXTENDED: March 8, 2015.
  • Notification of acceptance: TBD
  • Workshop Date: June 7-8th, 2015

Submissions

There are two types of submissions: short position statements and regular papers. Position papers are a maximum of 4 (four) pages. Regular papers are a maximum of 12 (twelve) pages. Papers should be submitted via the PlanRob 2015 EasyChair website: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=planrob2015 All papers should be typeset in the AAAI style, described at: http://www.aaai.org/Publications/Author/author.php removing AAAI copyright. Accepted papers will be published on the workshop website and printed as a hard-copy.

The organizers will investigate the availability of journal editors in order to invite higher quality papers from the PlanRob 2015 edition to a special issue or post-proceedings volume.

Any additional questions can be directed towards the general workshop contact email: mailto:planrob2015@easychair.org

Organization Chairs

Program Committee (To be completed)

  • Rachid Alami (LAAS-CNRS, France)
  • Sara Bernardini (King's College, UK)
  • Amedeo Cesta (CNR-ISTC, Italy)
  • Marcelo Cirillo (Orebro University, Sweden)
  • Alberto Finzi (Federico II University, Italy)
  • Robert Fitch (University of Sydney, Australia)
  • Maria Fox (King's College, UK)
  • Malik Ghallab (LAAS-CNRS, France)
  • Joachim Hertzberg (University of Osnabrueck, Germany)
  • Felix Ingrand (LAAS-CNRS, France)
  • Luca Iocchi (Sapienza University, Italy)
  • Gal Kaminka (Bar Ilan University, Israel)
  • Sven Koenig ( University of Southern California, USA)
  • Jonas Kvarnstrom (Linköpings University, Sweden)
  • Daniele Magazzeni (King's College, UK)
  • Daniele Nardi (Sapienza University, Italy)
  • Goldie Nejat (Toronto University, Canada)
  • Andrea Orlandini (CNR-ISTC, Italy)
  • Federico Pecora (Orebro University, Sweden)
  • Frederic Py (MBARI, USA)
  • Maria Dolores Rodriguez Moreno (Alcala University, Spain)
  • Enrico Scala (ANU Research School in Computer Science, Australia)
  • Siddarth Srivastava (Berkeley University, USA)
  • Florent Teichteil (Onera, France)